Important Children and Youth Related Research from Around the Nation

US-MapBrief Addresses Educational Needs of Justice-Involved: The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform releases Education and Interagency Collaboration: A Lifeline for Justice-Involved Youth. This focuses on the importance of collaboration between policymakers and educators to address the educational needs of youth at risk of entering, or involved in, the juvenile justice system.

The brief reviews research on education for system-involved youth and details recent efforts to improve educational outcomes for this population. The authors also highlight the Washington Education Advocate Program, a school-based transition program to bridge the education achievement gap for youth involved in the juvenile justice system in the state of Washington.

Info: https://goo.gl/bjTu2s

Report: More Than 127,000 Children Face Trauma As Immigrants, Refugees: A new report from Child Trends estimates more than 127,000 children will come to the United States from abroad in 2016, as immigrants or refugees. While these children have the potential to make vital contributions to our communities, they face a number of continued risks to their well-being. They may be re-traumatized via treatment in detention facilities or discrimination in schools, for example. And, their eligibility for services varies considerably depending on their legal status.

Info: https://goo.gl/wvpHZP

Parents’ Psychiatric Issues May Affect Children: Some children of parents with a history of psychiatric illness may be at higher risk for attempting suicide and/or engaging in violent behavior, a new Danish study suggests. Danes born to parents who had themselves attempted suicide, or who had struggled with antisocial personality disorder or marijuana abuse, were found to face the biggest risk for attempted suicide or violence — up to four times as high, the study contended. However, the study also showed that despite any potential elevated risk, people born to parents with a psychiatric illness or a violent history aren’t necessarily fated to experience similar difficulties.

Info: https://goo.gl/Knl6Fm

Classroom Screening Tests Can Work: District and state education leaders and teachers frequently use assessments to identify students who are at risk of performing poorly on end-of-year reading achievement tests. A new DoEd study demonstrates that a reading screening assessment predicted poor performance on a mathematics outcome (the Stanford Achievement Test) with similar levels of accuracy as screening assessments that specifically measure mathematics skills. These findings indicate that a school district could use an assessment of reading skills to screen for risk in both reading and mathematics, potentially reducing costs and testing time. In addition, this document provides a decision tree framework to support implementation of screening practices and interpretation by teachers.

Info: https://goo.gl/StU2ng

Teach For America Helps Math Ed, Little Impact for Social Studies, English: The DoEd What Works Clearinghouse reviewed research on Teach For America (TFA) teachers on the academic achievement of students. It found positive effects on mathematics achievement, potentially positive effects on science achievement, and no discernible effects on social studies and English language arts achievement. TFA is a highly selective route to teacher certification that aims to place non-traditionally trained teachers in high-need public schools.

Info: https://goo.gl/BXK2XS

Early College High Schools Improve Post-Secondary Readiness: A DoEd What Works Clearinghouse study of Early College High Schools (ECHS) find the program to have positive impacts on high school attendance, college readiness, staying in and completing school, general academic achievement, and college degree attainment. ECHS promotes college readiness, offers a college preparatory high school curriculum as well as college-level courses, and provides students with transferable college credit upon graduation from high school. This study looked at school districts throughout the state of North Carolina and included schools located in rural and urban settings with diverse demographics.

Info: https://goo.gl/G9i9Aw

DoEd Launches Toolkit to Improve Education Partnerships: DoEd launches the Toolkit of Resources for Engaging Families and Community as Partners in Education. It provides resources for school staff to build relationships with families and community members and to support family well-being, strong parent-child relationships, and students’ ongoing learning and development. Originally developed for the Guam Alliance for Family and Community Engagement in Education, the toolkit is based on information from a variety of sources that address engagement in diverse communities. The toolkit offers an integrated approach that helps school staff understand how their own cultural experiences may influence their beliefs and assumptions about families and community members, and consequently influences their efforts to engage others in the classroom.

Info: https://goo.gl/HT48n7

Best Practices Tool Rolled Out For k-12 Classroom: The DoEd,  Institute of Education Sciences (IES) — the independent research and statistics arm of the department — launches a new web site for the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC).  This site features an enhanced “Find What Works” tool that allows educators to find programs and interventions that evidence shows have had a positive impact on student outcomes.  The site also allows users to download “practice guides” with evidence-based recommendations for improving teaching and learning and search thousands of studies reviewed against the WWC’s rigorous standards.

Info: https://goo.gl/UnQsu9

About Frank Klimko

Frank Klimko is a nationally known journalist, grants expert and speech writer/speaker. He has years of experience helping nonprofits devise lists of the right funding opportunities and secure funding from these foundations and corporate entities. Clients have focused on an array of areas including child care, homeless, hunger and K-12 education. Additionally, he is a Freedom of Information Act expert, who has helped numerous clients with securing proprietary information from the federal government. Currently, Frank Klimko writes the Children & Youth Funding Report and Private Grants Alert, which are Washington DC-based publications. CYF is a daily publication covering Congress, the Education Dept. and the various federal regulatory agencies. PGA, another daily publication, covers the world of private philanthropy.
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