Important Children and Youth Related Research

Homeless Youth Likely Human Trafficking Victim: Nearly a fifth of homeless youth in the United States and Canada are victims of trafficking, reports from the University of Pennsylvania and Loyola University New Orleans find. Based on interviews with 911 homeless youth between the ages of 17 and 25 in 13 cities,  researchers at Penn’s Field Center for Children’s Policy, Practice & Research and Loyola’s Modern Slavery Research Project found that a combined 19.4% of those interviewed were victims of trafficking. Across the two studies, 15% of respondents had been trafficked for sex (including youths who were not coerced but were minors), 7.4% had been trafficked for labor; and 3% had been trafficked for both. LGBTQ individuals, who made up 19.2% of the homeless youth interviewed, were disproportionately more likely to be victims of sex trafficking, with 26.9% reporting that they had been trafficked for sex, accounting for 33.8% of all sex trafficking victims in the two studies. The studies also found that 32.1% of all respondents had been trafficked for sex, engaged in “survival sex,” or engaged in the sex trade in some way — including 40.5% of female respondents, 25.3% of male respondents, and 56% of transgender youth respondents.

Info: https://goo.gl/A6h3HZ

 

Global Philanthropy Grows: Global private philanthropy to developing nations totaled a record $64 billion in 2104, a report from the Hudson Institute’s Center for Global Prosperity finds. Based on an examination of private giving to the developing  world, the 2016 edition of The Index of Global Philanthropy and Remittances found that global philanthropy hit a record $64 billion in 2014, with the United States contributing two-thirds of the total ($44 billion), followed by the United Kingdom ($4.9 billion), Japan ($4.5 billion), Germany ($1.9 billion), and Canada ($1.7 billion). In addition, the report found that financial flows from philanthropy, private capital investments, and remittances from the 39 countries totaled $801 billion, while government aid totaled $147 billion.

Info: https://goo.gl/gd4S8a

 

Investments Poised for Growth, Study Finds: A focus on providing impact investments in the creative economy could help stabilize vulnerable communities and attract quality jobs to struggling regions of the country, a report from the Calvert Foundation and Upstart Co-Lab finds. The report, Creative Places & Businesses: Catalyzing Growth in Communities found that while impact investment in the creative economy to date has occurred largely under the radar, the opportunity to generate financial gain and social impact through art, culture, design, and innovation has never been greater. The study identified 26 projects in 14 states with total project costs of $1.54 billion seeking impact investment capital between 2017 and 2022, including $338 million in debt financing provided by community development financial institutions and community lenders and $1.13 billion in impact and conventional equity, tax credits, and similar subsidies. Wealth advisors also confirmed to researchers that impact investors are eager to invest in the arts, creative businesses, and so-called creative places — which it defines as multi-tenant affordable real estate projects targeting creatives and benefiting their neighbors.

Info: https://goo.gl/WrL4ue

 

Consumers Seek Healthcare Price Information:  Although half of Americans research the price of healthcare services before receiving care, more work is needed to achieve widespread adoption and use of such price information, a report from Public Agenda finds. Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson and New York State Health foundations, the report, Still Searching: How People Use Health Care Price Information in the United States, New York State, Florida, Texas and New Hampshire found that 50% of survey respondents had sought information about how much they would have to pay out of pocket, not including co-pays, and/or how much their insurers would pay. Insured respondents with higher deductibles (69%) and those who had been uninsured in the past year (63%) were more likely to have tried to find price information, as were those with four-year college degrees, women, African Americans, and people under the age of 30. More than half of all respondents, however, did not know that hospitals and doctors often charge varying prices for the same service.

Info: https://goo.gl/tobxKC

 

K-12 Charities Saw Fundraising Revenue Boost: Three out of five U.S. nonprofit organizations saw an increase in fundraising revenue in 2016, while two-thirds expect to see additional growth in 2017, a report from the Nonprofit Research Collaborative finds.

Based on a survey of more than 900 charities, the Winter 2017 Nonprofit Fundraising Study: Covering Charitable Receipts at Nonprofit Organizations in the United States and Canada found that while seven in 10 U.S. respondents met their fundraising goals in 2016, only six out of 10 (61%) reported year-over-year increases in revenue — down from 65% in 2015, the first decline registered by the survey since 2013. Of the U.S. charities surveyed, 24% reported a decrease in donations during the 2016 election campaign, with 20% seeing a dropoff after the election. In terms of issue areas, 67% of human services organizations reported an increase in fundraising revenue in 2016, followed by K-12 education (64%), and health (63%) nonprofits, while those focused on public-society benefit (29%) and higher education (52%) were the least likely to see increases.

Info: https://goo.gl/czX5mY

 

Proposed Tax Reforms Would Reduce Charitable Giving: Tax reforms proposed by Republican lawmakers and the Trump administration would reduce charitable giving by as much as $13.1 billion, a study commissioned by Independent Sector and conducted by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy finds. The report, Tax Policy and Charitable Giving, estimates proposals to lower the top marginal tax rate and raise the standard deduction would reduce charitable giving by between 1.7% ($4.9 billion) and 4.6% ($13.1 billion), with giving to religious institutions falling 4.7%, compared with a 4.4% decline in giving to other types of charities. According to the report, federal tax revenues also would decline by some 3% (between $88.2 billion and $88.7 billion). The White House blueprint and the House Republican proposal would double the standard deduction for individuals to $12,600 and $12,000, respectively ($24,000 for joint filers under both proposals) and reduce the number of tax brackets. Under both proposals, the charitable deduction would only be available to individuals who itemize their deductions

Info: https://goo.gl/GxtnYz

 

Millennials Likely to Give More as They Get Older: As they get older, millennials are showing signs of being as charitable as older generations, a new study by Campbell Rinker finds. Based on surveys conducted in Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States, the report, Millennial Donors: They’re Not Who You Think They Are, found that millennials — defined for purposes of the study as those born between 1982 and 2000 — currently give less than older donors. In the past year, for example, American millennials gave $580 to charity on average, compared with $799 by Gen Xers (those born between 1965 and 1982), $1,365 by boomers (1946-64), and $1,093 by Matures (1945 or earlier). At the same time, the survey found that, in the U.S., millennials were similar to Gen Xers and boomers in two key respects, both of them indicators of an individual’s propensity to give — commitment to volunteering and regular attendance at religious services. The study also found that 71% of U.S. millennials said they planned to give to a church or other place of worship in the coming year, while 22% planned to boost their giving in the coming year.

Info: https://goo.gl/94CjG5 (report).

About Frank Klimko

Frank Klimko is a nationally known journalist, grants expert and speech writer/speaker. He has years of experience helping nonprofits devise lists of the right funding opportunities and secure funding from these foundations and corporate entities. Clients have focused on an array of areas including child care, homeless, hunger and K-12 education. Additionally, he is a Freedom of Information Act expert, who has helped numerous clients with securing proprietary information from the federal government. Currently, Frank Klimko writes the Children & Youth Funding Report and Private Grants Alert, which are Washington DC-based publications. CYF is a daily publication covering Congress, the Education Dept. and the various federal regulatory agencies. PGA, another daily publication, covers the world of private philanthropy.
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